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Indie Blockchain Games Give Big Developers a Run for Their Money

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Halo-Devin

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Earlier this year, video game design company Ubisoft – famous for international franchises like Assassin’s Creed, Far Cry, and Prince of Persia – announced that it is pursuing new applications of blockchain technology in its video games. The French video game developer, the fourth-largest in the world by market capacity, is joining several large institutions in jumping on the blockchain bandwagon.

Blockchain may have started as a grassroots movement, but it’s trajectory is most definitely towards big business. Now that the original adopters of blockchain technologies – innovators like Charlie Lee, Chris Larsen, and the other intrepid coin entrepreneurs that launched new cryptocurrencies in the past few years – have proven to the markets that blockchain technology is the future. However, in doing so, they caught the attention of some big corporate players.

Now, blockchain technology - something that started as an ideological movement away from centralization - is now consolidating into yet another small department found in the headquarters of every corporate mega-giant in America. Up-and-coming blockchain tech companies like Block & Chain Game Studios don’t want to see that happen unchallenged. We’re developing and launching new indie games powered by the blockchain, pushing aside the big gaming businesses and showing the world the power of blockchain gaming.
 
Gaming is Big Business

No doubt about it, the gaming industry has been blowing up. Ubisoft – the gaming giant that is hoping to grow even bigger on the back of some new blockchain innovation – was established over thirty years ago, just one year after Nintendo released its original NES. This is back in the day when arcade gaming dominated the markets, and home computing was an experimental technology at a stage in development largely analogous to where blockchain is today.

As personal technology developed in the 1990s and 2000s, worldwide gaming revenues skyrocketed. Last year, gamers worldwide spent nearly $109 billion on online, arcade, and console-based games. And, unfortunately, most of this money has gone to line the coffers of a few big companies who are still riding the benefits of their early-mover advantages.
 
Indie Games Make a Comeback

Developing a video game – or a good one, at least – is really hard. It requires coordination between sophisticated content platforms, programmers and publishers, distributors, and of course the gamers themselves. Big companies that are already set up to integrate all of these activities together have a clear advantage. As a result, lots of big companies can develop video games quicker and cheaper than indie companies like Block & Chain. But, they can’t necessarily do it better.

The past few years have seen a resurgence in indie game developers who are not beholden to large corporations and as such are free to explore long-neglected genres. Game platforms are picking up on this and now we are seeing platforms like Xbox Live Arcade and Steam lowering the barriers for distribution of independent games. The time is ripe for independent blockchain developers to make their move!

Block & Chain is disrupting the gaming industry. Video gamers make up a cool and creative community. We love art, adventure, and imagination – not corporate control. For too long, gaming has been dominated by monoliths still riding the wave of the personal computing innovations of the last decade. Now, blockchain gaming is creating a new wave, clearing a path for enterprising new innovators like the talented developers at Block & Chain. There will be plenty of exciting things coming from Block & Chain in the very near future, so keep up to date by following us on at any of our other media outreach platforms:

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